Persieds Meteor Shower 2017

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The Persieds Meteor Shower is a yearly event in August as the Earth travels through the dust left behind by the Comet Swift-Tuttle as it orbits the Earth.

This year, the peak time was 1am on the 13th August, however, the bright Moon in the sky was going to wash out most of the visible Meteors and make photography a little tricky. Therefore, I decided to set the camera up and point North East towards the Perseus Constellation (where the shower gains it’s name) before Moon rise to capture some of the early starters.

The image below is the best of the bunch. If you look closely, you can actually see 3 Meteors that burnt up within this 20 second exposure. It’s amazing to think that these bright “shooting stars” are dust the size of a grain of sand!

What I love about this shot is not only is the Milky Way clearly evident, but also the Andromeda Galaxy is showing herself off too!

{Click image for a higher resolution, click Flickr Link in caption to view photo on Flickr}

Persieds Meteors - D810, AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8 @ 14mm, f/3.2, ISO3200, 20sec - {Flickr Link}

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Review of “Exposure Calculator” App for Android by Quicosoft (Video)

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There are plenty of resources to calculate changes to the Exposure Triangle and as a photographer you really should be able to work them out in your head. However, sometimes it’s easier to cheat when out shooting so that you can concentrate more on getting those shots than working out exposure times.

As I’m about to try my hand at Moonlit Night Landscapes, a new thing for me, I wanted to be able to take test shots to check for lighting conditions. Moonlit photography can demand very long exposure times at base ISO (the lowest your camera will go without any extended ISOs) which means getting the exposure correct means less time standing out in the dark.

To test for good lighting, you can set the lens to be fully open (lowest f/ number) and bump up the ISO to a high setting, 6400 for example. This means you can take a test shot with the exposure time being seconds rather than many minutes. Then when you have a good lit shot, adjust the aperture to suit and lower the ISO. However, what exposure time do you need?

Well, as a photographer, you should be able to work this out using the Exposure Triangle (Video coming on this soon!), but when making large adjustments of 2 parameters (ISO and Aperture) it can take some time to work out. This is why I searched for an Android App to assist.

As mentioned at the start of this post, there are a lot of resources and apps out there, but Exposure Calculator by Quicosoft for Android is so good I thought I’d share it. Just for the record, I have no affiliation with Quicosoft, I like the app that much I wanted to share it.

If you just want to watch the video, skip to the bottom!

The App is available (Google Play Store) in 2 versions, Exposure Calculator and Exposure Calculator – Donate (see links below), and are both identical with the latter simply throwing a few £/$/€ the authors way.

Exposure Calculator in the Play Store



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Sunset from the border of the Algarve and Alentejo

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This last week we had a visit from my sister (and family) and whilst I was out giving her a tour around the hills, I spotted an abandoned windmill on the top of a ridge and thought it would make a good foreground for a sunset.

This evening, I returned to the windmill just before sundown.

The sunset wasn’t as good as the Algarve can be gifted with, but enough colours to snap a few shots which you can see below;

{Click image for a higher resolution, click Flickr Link in caption to view photo on Flickr}
Abandonded Windmill Sunset - D810, AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8 @ 16mm, f/11, ISO64, 1/60sec - {Flickr Link}

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Milky Way and Palm

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The Milky Way is visible to the naked eye from our garden right now, so I thought I’d point the camera up and see what it would pick up.

Ok, not exactly award winning Astro-Photography but it goes to show how little light pollution there is here in the hills of the Algarve. I look forward to getting out in the coming days and weeks looking for some good locations for shots.

If you look close, you’ll even spot a shooting star! Due to the high resolution of the stars, it’s much better to look at the photo on my Flickr Page

{Click image for a higher resolution, click Flickr Link in caption to view photo on Flickr}
Milky Way and Palm - D810, AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8 @ 14mm, f/2.8, ISO3200, 20sec - {Flickr Link}

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