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Pink Moon Rise

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I was outside tonight just as the Moon had risen above the hilltops. It was bright pink in colour, I’m assuming it was the same in other locations of the Northen Hemisphere too, particularly in the same Time Zone. Did you also see it?

We have some Palm trees at the front of the house that are lit by LED lights which I used to create a frame for the shot.

The credit to the framing has to go to my partner, Emma, who spotted this a few days ago albeit the Moon was the other side of the Palm tree (possibly a better frame too but don’t tell her!).

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Moon Rise & Palm Tree

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Greater Flamingos of the Algarve

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Yesterday myself and partner took a trip to Ria de Alvor. Although it was for a picnic and for me to Kayak around the fantastic estuary at Alvor (video here if you are interested), I took my camera and 300mm lens (remembering that my 500mm is still out for repair).

Ria de Alvor is a nature reserve and home to many different birds including the Greater Flamingo.

The adult Flamingos were not in a great position and difficult to get to photograph, however, some of the younger birds were very close to the paths. I also had a 1.7x Teleconverter with me to take the 300mm to 500mm and although the quality isn’t as great as the 500mm lens, still a good backup.

As you can see, they are not pink!?!? Greater Flamingo’s plumage only turn pink after a few years as an adult, these youngsters are yet to turn.

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(Young) Greater Flamingo - Phoenicopterus roseus

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Red Rumped Swallows at the Quinta

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The Red Rump Swallows nest here at our “Quinta” and will be getting ready to leave soon. They arrive later than the other Swallows and Swifts and also leave slightly later too.

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Red Rumped Swallow - D810, AF-S 300mm f/2.8 @ 300mm, f/8, ISO320, 1/2000sec - {Flickr Link}

They are a little larger than the Barn Swallow and as the name suggests have a rusty coloured rump (which gets darker with age). Their nests are different too with a tunnel entrance. This year, they occupied the same nest as last year, but decided to add an extension to the tunnel. You can see the darker colour of the entrance in the photo below;

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Milky Way Over The Barragem de Odelouca

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Before the Galactic Core of the Milky way dips below the horizon for the Winter months, I thought I’d get out and grab a photo, continue reading below if you are interested in how I planned for the shot.

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Galaxy Over Lake - D810, AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8 @ 14mm, f/2.8, ISO3200, 20sec - {Flickr Link}

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Today We Rescued a Ladder Snake (Video)

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Today myself and partner Emma were walking through our Neighbour’s farmland and we stopped to look in an old well. To my surprise, there was an adult Ladder Snake swimming around trying to find a way out.

The well is at least 20 feet (6 meters), if not a lot more, so there was no way the Snake was going to get out. Emma ran off to pull up a long Bamboo to rescue it.

The Bamboo was just long enough to drop down into the water and the Snake happily climbed on. After a careful raise the snake was free.

I captured some video on my mobile, it’s not great as I was a bit nervous of dropping my phone down the well.

Ladder Snakes are very common here in the hills of the Algarve as it’s the perfect habitat for them. They are non-venomous so completely harmless although if threatened can appear to be aggressive. The juveniles have a ladder pattern on their back, but this disappears with age. They can grow up to around 160cm long.

{Remember to watch in HD if possible}


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